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Camp Chef Vs Pit Boss – Which is Better and Which Should You Buy?

Let's compare the best of both camp chef and pit boss pellet grills, to see which is better and which you should choose to buy.

Last Updated: April 17, 2021

camp chef vs Pit Boss written under an image of their two logos on a red background

If you’re shopping for a pellet grill, the two names of Camp Chef and Pit Boss will be on your mind. This comparison article compares each company, reviews their top grills, and helps you choose the best one for your lifestyle.

As I write this, the World Junior Hockey Championships are underway. Every year, the same four or five top teams battle for gold, while a revolving cast of also-rans hope to eke out a semi-final berth maybe.

It’s kinda like that with pellet grills. You just keep seeing the same names over and over. And that’s ok – it’s like that because they’re the best at what they do.

Today’s match sees Camp Chef take on Pit Boss, two of the better-known names in pellet grilling, and both having entries in our list of the best pellet grills available today. While Camp Chef chases the upper end and Pit Boss is more budget-friendly, there’s a fair bit of overlap in their products and target audience.

To help you make the best choice for your next (or first) pellet grill, we’re revealing some of the history of each brand and what makes them unique. Then, they go head-to-head in eight rounds of direct comparisons in key decision-making categories.

It all wraps up with reviews of three of the best grills from each company. By the end of your read, you’ll have a clear picture of which maker belongs on your patio.

All set? Then it’s game on!

Camp Chef Vs Pit Boss – Brand Overviews

Let’s get to know our two teams before we dig into their rosters.

Camp Chef History

An American outdoor enthusiast founded Camp Chef in 1990. He was disappointed with the quality of camp stoves available and decided to take matters into his own hands. To this day, Camp Chef still produces and sells the Pro60, his original portable propane stove.

Today, Camp Chef’s line-up includes various portable BBQs, flat-top grills, smokers, and pellet grills. The pellet grill roster boasts approximately ten different models in a range of styles and colors.

Cache Valley, Utah, is Camp Chef’s base of operations, from where they offer friendly, personalized customer care.

Pit Boss History

Pit Boss first fired up back in 1999 in Alberta, Canada. With so much good local beef, it’s a logical place for great barbecue. They’ve since moved to Phoenix, Arizona, but it’s still a family-focused business dedicated to quality craftsmanship and building barbecues that last.

Browsing their shop reveals a roster of over 20 pellet grills, including vertical smokers and combo pellet/gas grills. Pit Boss also builds and sells griddles, gas grills and smokers, charcoal grills, kamado-style ceramic grills, electric smokers, and a 3-in-1 contraption with a gas grill, a charcoal grill, and an electric smoker all on a single cart. You have to see it to believe it!

Pit Boss strives to bring pellet grilling to the masses with minimal loss of quality. Their motto is “Bigger. Hotter. Heavier.”

Camp Chef Vs Pit Boss Comparison

These eight criteria are crucial when we review products and should be on your mind when you’re buying a grill. How do our competitors rank in each category?

Build Quality and Construction

Neither company cuts corners when it comes to construction. Camp Chef tends to favor stainless steel, while Pit Boss goes for 16- or 14-gauge steel; both are excellent. Below the cookers, you’ll find sturdy carts, usually with lower shelves for extra storage and stability.

So, what’s the deciding factor?

Verdict

It all comes down to wheels. Maybe it’s just me, but I really don’t like the steel, spoked wheels Pit Boss puts on many of its grills. I far prefer Camp Chef’s plastic or resin wheels for smoother rolling. Camp Chef rolls away with this one, but not by much.

Cooking Space

Camp Chef grills main cooking surfaces come in three sizes: 663, 429, or 253 square inches. Secondary surfaces vary, and there’s plenty of variety.

Pit Boss has more sizes, but the ones we’ve reviewed feature primary cooking surfaces of 649, 442, and 330 square inches, respectively. Highly comparable to the Camp Chef line-up.

However, the upper racks tend to be quite small on Pit Boss grills, as we typically see on gas grills.

Verdict

If you like to smoke a lot, you may prefer the larger secondary surfaces found on Camp Chef grills. This round goes to CC.

Temperature Range

All six grills we reviewed have temperature ranges of approximately 160°F to 500°F, give or take a bit off either end. Since the extremes aren’t important, we can discard those small differences.

Several models also offer the ability to sear at high temperatures directly over the flames. No deciding factor based on this, either.

Verdict

Ties are lame, but I have no choice in this case. Both are winners!

Temperature Control

All Pit Boss grills feature simple, user-friendly digital controls, typically with a basic interface. Their best units offer ports for a pair of meat probes and a clear display for monitoring your cook.

Camp Chef recently revamped its controllers. The new Gen2 and Woodwind controllers feature unrivaled programming for steady, accurate temperatures, and either two or four meat probe ports. Displays are large, with some in full-color. And, many units feature Wi-Fi connectivity for remote monitoring via a smartphone app.

Verdict

There’s nothing wrong with Pit Boss’s digital brains. But Camp Chef’s are better. Winner winner, (smoked) chicken dinner.

Hopper Capacity

The Camp Chef grills reviewed below come with either a 22-pound or 18-pound hopper.

Our Pit Boss selections offer 31, 20, and 10 pounds.

A typical bag of pellets is 20 pounds, so I consider a hopper that holds anything less than that a nuisance – unless it’s on a portable grill.

Verdict

While 31 and 20 pounds are solid, 10 is silly, to me, on a backyard pellet grill. At least 18 is almost a full bag. I’m giving this one to Camp Chef.

Added Features, Bells and Whistles

Pit Boss doesn’t go in for the “extras” as much as some companies. Having said that, you almost always get a lower shelf, which I dig, and usually a side shelf, too, sometimes with a tray. For add-ons, you can retro-fit many Pit Boss pellet grills with hopper extensions and Wi-Fi/Bluetooth-enabled controllers.

Camp Chef offers more bonuses right in the box, like standard Wi-Fi capability on most new models and built-in meat probe ports (with probes included). Sweet add-ons available include a sear station and a small oven you can install on the side.

Verdict

What you get with Pit Boss varies widely with the model you choose. Camp Chef offers more standard features that are upgrades for most companies. Camp Chef for the win.

Price

Price is never as important as value; is what I’m getting worth what I’m paying? Whether the bottom line is $500 or $1500, value trumps all.

On average, Camp Chef pellet grills are more expensive than Pit Boss’s. That’s not a knock against either company. Personally, I feel like both offer terrific value.

Verdict

We’re almost comparing apples to oranges here, so it feels a bit unfair to declare a winner. Ultimately, though, I think the higher price of a Camp Chef is more than worthwhile considering the extra features you get.

Warranty

Camp Chef provides a 3-year limited warranty against their own defects. Pretty standard stuff. Additionally, you have 30 days to return your grill, unused, for a full refund, minus shipping costs.

Pit Boss gives you 5-year coverage on all parts for manufacturer’s defects. I found no info about a return policy.

Verdict

Are you really likely to return your grill without using it? Heck no! Pit Boss is the Warranty Champ by a wide margin.

Overall Camp Chef Vs Pit Boss Winner

Let’s be clear – there’s no loser here. Camp Chef and Pit Boss each make great pellet grills, and we happily recommend any one of the following 6 grills, if it suits your needs.

But, our top overall pick is Camp Chef, for great value and enhanced features.

Camp Chef Vs Pit Boss – Grill Reviews

Now that you’ve learned about our two contenders for your pellet grilling dollars, it’s time to review a sampling of their best grills. Which one is right for you?

1

Camp Chef Woodwind Wi-Fi 36

♔ Recommended

The Camp Chef Woodwind Wi-Fi 36 is a huge grill that offers something most grills do not; the secondary cooking area is almost as large as the main grate. If you’re into smoking ribs and other height-challenged cuts, that’s fantastic news. And for regular grilling, the massive 663 square inch main grate can feed a small army all at once.

It’s loaded with premium features, including an exceptionally intelligent and well-designed digital controller. The full-color screen is large, and the single dial/button combo is easy to operate.

You can plug in up to four meat probe thermometers – which are included, thank you very much! – for on-board monitoring of your meat. Of course, you’ll probably want to use the app on your phone and keep tabs remotely via Wi-Fi.

We also love that with a simple pull of a handle, you can expose the firepot to the grill for direct-heat cooking and searing right over the flames.

Specs

  • Primary cooking area: 663 sq. in.
  • Secondary cooking area: 573 sq. in.
  • Hopper capacity: 22 lbs.
  • Temperature range: 160°F to 500°F; direct flame cooking up to 650°F
  • 3-year warranty

Pros

  • Detailed display with weather-resistant cover
  • Includes 4 meat probe thermometers
  • Slide and Grill feature for over-the-flame cooking and true searing
  • Smoke Number system to increase/decrease smoke volume
  • Hopper window to view pellet reserves
  • Bluetooth/Wi-Fi-enabled for smartphone app connectivity

Cons

  • It’s very large, maybe too large for some yards or patios (In which case, you can try the smaller Wi-Fi 24)

Learn more and find current pricing and availability here:

Check Price on Amazon

2

Camp Chef Smokepro SG24

♔ Recommended

Want big smoke in a small space? Don’t skip this review.

The Camp Chef SmokePro SG24 provides tons of space between the two grates to line ‘em up and let ‘em soak up the smoke – the two racks are nearly the same size. And with room for 22 pounds in the hopper (more than a full bag), you can smoke for hours and hours.

The digital control interface is simplified, but no less brilliant than the Woodwind version. It comes with two meat probes for direct connection to the controller, and you can ratchet up (or down) the smoke levels by setting your Smoke Number.

Also included is the Slide and Grill feature. This simple mechanism exposes the firepot, so you can grill and sear right over the flames.

Specs

  • Primary cooking area: 429 sq. in.
  • Secondary cooking area: 382 sq. in.
  • Hopper capacity: 22 lbs.
  • Temperature range: 160°F to 500°F; direct flame cooking up to 650°F
  • 3-year warranty

Pros

  • Large digital display and temperature monitor
  • Includes 2 meat probe thermometers
  • Slide and Grill feature for over-the-flame cooking and true searing
  • Smoke Number system to increase/decrease smoke volume
  • Hopper window to view pellet reserves
  • Bluetooth/Wi-Fi-enabled for smartphone app connectivity

Cons

  • Lacks lower shelf for storage and added stability
  • May be hard to reach back of main grate due to size of secondary grate

For the latest price and availability, follow this link:

Check Price on Amazon

3

Camp Chef Smokepro DLX 24 Pellet Grill – Bronze

♔ Recommended

For a simple, approachable pellet grilling and smoking experience, this back-to-basics unit delivers.

Essentially a stripped-down SG24, the DLX24 has a smaller upper rack, smaller hopper, no Wi-Fi, and no Slide and Grill feature for direct heat grilling.

But, let’s focus on the positives: you DO get a high-quality digital control center that’s easy to operate, two meat probes for accurate cooks, and you’ll always get as much or as little smoke as you enjoy with the Smoke Number feature.

You may like the price tag, too – it’s also stripped down, making this a very appealing pellet grill.

Specs

  • Primary cooking area: 429 sq. in.
  • Secondary cooking area: 141 sq. in.
  • Hopper capacity: 18 lbs.
  • Temperature range: 160°F to 500°F
  • 3-year warranty

Pros

  • Large, intuitive on-board digital display and controller
  • Includes 2 meat probe thermometers
  • Smoke Number system to increase/decrease smoke volume
  • Hopper window to view pellet reserves

Cons

  • No Wi-Fi features
  • No access to direct heat for searing (a sear box attachment is available from Camp Chef)

For more pics, specs, and order info, just click this:

Check Price on Campchef.com

4

Pit Boss 72440-Pb440d Grill 440 Deluxe

Recommended

Hey! Who’s that looking flashy in two-tone black and copper? The Pit Boss PB440D is more than just a pretty face, though; this is a simple pellet grill that offers some appealing convenience features and a great cooking experience.

It’s a bit on the small side, but there’s enough room on the main grate for (according to Pit Boss) 20 burgers. I don’t know about that, but for sure a dozen good-size patties will fit. You also have sufficient height for a big ol’ brisket, roast, or shoulder.

Solidly built from high-quality steel and boasting cast iron main cooking grates, the Pit Boss PB440D makes an ideal introductory pellet grill. For a departure from your usual gas or charcoal cooker, it’s an excellent purchase.

Specs

  • Primary cooking area: 340 sq. in.
  • Secondary cooking area: 124 sq. in.
  • Hopper capacity: 10 lbs.
  • Temperature range: 180F to 500F
  • 5-year warranty

Pros

  • Can sear/flame-broil over direct heat
  • Bottom storage shelf
  • Porcelain-coated cast iron grids for better heat distribution and durability
  • Simple user interface
  • Large side shelf with included tray
  • Durable 16-gauge steel construction

Cons

  • Can’t connect meat probe thermometers directly to controller
  • Steel wheels are unattractive and impractical

Get all the relevant ordering details on this simple but satisfying pellet grill here:

Check Price on Amazon

5

Pit Boss 71700FB Pellet Grill With Flame Broiler

Recommended

I totally get that pellet grilling and all it offers might seem overwhelming to some. The Pit Boss 700FB is a fine way to ease yourself into this new world.

Featuring a simple thermostat without Wi-Fi and no built-in probes, you really just set it and forget it; dial up your temperature, and let the grill do its thing. (Of course, we recommend using your own digital probe thermometer for the very best, guess-free results.)

If smoking is what you’re most interested in, you’ll want to experiment with the timer-based “Smoke” setting on the controller. Once you have the hang of it, you’ll love the ability to dial in your preferred smoke level.

The Pit Boss 700FB features a sliding panel in the heat deflector for direct exposure to the firepot below. Unlike with many pellet grills, you’ll be searing over the fire like you would on a typical gas or charcoal grill.

Specs

  • Primary cooking area: 442 sq. in.
  • Secondary cooking area: 225 sq. in.
  • Hopper capacity: 20 lbs.
  • Temperature range: 180F to 500F
  • 5-year warranty

Pros

  • Can sear/flame-broil over direct heat
  • Bottom storage shelf
  • Porcelain-coated cast iron grids for better heat distribution and durability
  • Simple user interface
  • Rugged 14-gauge steel construction

Cons

  • No work surfaces
  • Controller lacks Wi-Fi, meat probe ports
  • Again with those basic steel wheels. Have you never heard of plastic?

Follow the link to view and purchase:

Check Price on Amazon

6

Pit Boss Austin Xl Pellet Grill

Recommended

Big, sturdy, good-looking – at first glance, this is a very attractive pellet grill. When you dig a little deeper, though, you’ll find out the Austin XL’s appeal is more than skin deep.

Beneath the coordinated copper-hued chimney cap, and hopper and cooking chamber lids, are a sturdy cart with four wheels and a handy lower storage shelf. The huge hopper is where you’ll find an excellent digital control center, including a large display and dual meat probe ports. (Oddly, they only give you one in the box.)

Smoke enthusiasts will love the “Smoke” setting for adding a load of smoky flavor. And if you love to sear, you’ll want to take advantage of the slide-away panel in the heat deflector. Push it aside to expose the firepot and let the open flames work their magic on your steaks, chops, and more. Grilling nirvana!

Specs

  • Primary cooking area: 649 sq. in.
  • Secondary cooking area: 288 sq. in.
  • Hopper capacity: 31 lbs.
  • Temperature range: 180F to 500F
  • 5-year warranty

Pros

  • Can sear/flame-broil over direct heat
  • Bottom storage shelf
  • Porcelain-coated cast iron grids for better heat distribution and durability
  • Upgraded digital controller
  • Side shelf for workspace
  • 4 wheels, including 2 locking casters and 2 roller blade-style wheels

Cons

  • Chimney is inconveniently located right over the side shelf
  • Two ports but only one probe included

Here’s your handy link for current availability and pricing:

Check Price on Amazon

Wrapping it up

So many grills, so many features – so many tasty meals waiting to happen! Did you find your new pellet grill on our list comparing Camp Chef vs Pit Boss?

If not, that’s ok! We have many more articles just like this one, plus in-depth reviews to help you decide.

The fun’s not over then, either. Stick with us for recipes, grilling and smoking tips, and reviews of awesome BBQ gear to help you get the most out of your backyard cooking experience.

Thanks for spending your online time with us and for trusting us with this important quest for knowledge. Good luck and wishes for delicious food to you!

I'm a self-proclaimed BBQ nut, and the founder and chief editor here at Food Fire Friends.

I love cooking outdoors over live fire and smoke whatever the weather, using various grills, smokers, and wood-fired ovens to produce epic food. My goal with this site is to help as many people as possible enjoy and be good at doing the same.

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